projects

 

projects - economic/business development

 

Client Report: Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County Housing Authorities

Bonneville Research was hired by the Housing Authorities of Salt Lake City (HASLC) and Salt Lake County (HACSL) to consider whether the two public agencies should merge.
 
Background:

Both are Public Housing Authorities (PHAs), which were created in to provide and promote affordable housing for low-income persons residing in Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County.
 
The principal mechanisms the two authorities use to accomplish this are through the following three programs:

  • Authority Owned Properties
  • Housing Choice Section 8 Vouchers
  • Low Income Tax Credit Housing

The owned properties of the Housing Authority of Salt Lake City (HASLC) are only in Salt Lake City, but the owned properties of the Housing Agency of the County of Salt Lake (HACSL) are located throughout the County.

Bonneville Research Findings:

Almost 80% of public housing facilities are located in Salt Lake City, South Salt Lake, West Valley City and Millcreek

HOUSING UNIT LOCATIONS Housing Authority of Salt Lake City Housing Authority of the County of Salt Lake
 TOTAL 1,580 1,136
Salt Lake City 1,580 149
South Salt Lake   333
West Valley City   256
Millcreek   156
Midvale   62
Kearns   54
Taylorsville   47
Magna   41
West Jordan   16
Holladay   14
Murray   5
Sandy   3

Source: HASLC, HACSL, Bonneville Research, 2015
 
Using sophisticated GIS mapping analysis the same information looks like this.

The owned properties of both Authorities are clustered in the Salt Lake City, South Salt Lake City and the unincorporated areas of Millcreek and Kearns:

Housing Map


Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers help pay for 65% of public housing.

While the Section 8 Vouchers of both Salt Lake City and County Authorities may be used by the recipients anywhere they choose, they are clustered in almost identical areas in Salt Lake City South Salt Lake City, Murray and the unincorporated area of Millcreek.

map2

Salt Lake City is the location of almost 50% of all Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LITC) projects in Salt Lake County and even though they are few in number, the LITC projects are the only low income housing projects serving the South Valley.

LITC Map

More to come...

 

Client Report: West Valley City

 
West Valley City's North West Economic Development Project Area

WVC Warehouse

The first building in the Freeport West development is nearly completed and if you're driving on SR 201 around 7200 West, you won't be able to miss it. It's the 500,000 square foot building on the south side of the highway. What's even more remarkable is this is not the largest of the buildings planned in the West Valley City North West Economic Development Project Area. By completion, this project area is expected to have over 6 million square feet of industrial/manufacturing building and be home to over 4,000 employees.

While this mega building has yet to hit the property tax rolls, it is estimated that the taxable value will be in the neighborhood of $35 million in real and personal property.

WVC Warehouse

So, how can you build 6 million square feet of industrial property on land with:

  • Limited access
  • Scarce utilities
  • A large power line that needs to be relocated, and
  • Wetland issues?

#1.  Creation an Economic Development Area through the West Valley City Redevelopment Agency
 

#2  Tax Increment Funding (TIF) with participation from all Taxing Entities

  • Granite School District
  • Salt Lake County
  • West Valley City
  • All Special Service Districts

#3  State funding for a new Frontage Road

#4  Developer willing to invest $300 million +/-

Warehouse Interior

Bonneville Research worked for West Valley City to evaluate the financial feasibility of the proposed development, prepared the Benefit Analysis and the Budget for the North West Economic Development Project Area which helped offset some of the extraordinary costs associated with this property.

Enhanced Business Plan - Utah State Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control

Utah Liquor Stores

 

Bonneville Research just accepted an assignment to work with the Utah Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to develop a business plan that minimizes costs while maximizing profits.

The Utah Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control regulates the manufacture, sale and use of alcoholic beverages. Without promoting the sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages, the Department operates as a public business using sound management principles with the intent of servicing the public demand for alcoholic products.

Interesting Facts: 

 Between 2000 and 2009

  1. Alcohol sales +94%
  2. State population +25%
  3. DUI's +9%
  4. Liquor law violations -28%
  5. Drunkenness violations+1%
  6. Total Juvenile alcohol violations -4%

Other:

  • In FY 2010 beer, wine and liquor sales contributed $27.9 million to the School Lunch Program and paid $14.8 million in sales taxes
  • Store #15 in Cottonwood Heights on 7000 South had $16 million in 2010 sales with a net profit of $4.6 million.
  • Store #36 on Swede Alley in Park City had $1.3 million in 2010 sales with a net profit of $.2 million.
  • The average net profit from a state liquor store in 2010 was $1.75 million.

Top selling items are:

  1. Barton Vodka
  2. Jagermeister
  3. Patron Silver
  4. Smirnoff Vodka
  5. Crown Royal Whiskey

Source: DABC 2010 Annual Report, Utah Department of Public Safety, Bonneville Research, 2011.

 

INTERACTIVE MAPS

 

Bonneville Research prepared interactive maps showing where current State Liquor and Wine stores are located and where grocery store anchored shopping centers are located and which ones may to too close to schools, churches and other "public places".

Click on the following link to see!

http://bonnevilleresearch.com/dabc/index.html

 

Planning/Economic Development - Daggett County/Dutch John, Utah

alt

Daggett County in the northeastern corner of the State has the smallest population among Utah’s 29 counties.  It enjoys beautiful landscapes and recreational opportunities, but is struggling to take advantage of the opportunities this affords.  In 1998 the U.S. Congress privatized the land in the Bureau of Reclamation town of Dutch John.  The county received the land that wasn’t sold to existing lessees and was also given an annual stipend to assist with the transition from federal to local ownership.  It was anticipated by some that Dutch John would soon be a booming resort town that would provide tax revenue for the county and opportunities for private ownership in a county that is over 90% state and federally owned.

Daggett County and local residents participated in planning processes during the privatization process and afterwards through the General Plan.  Unfortunately, the planning and analysis done during this process has not culminated in the anticipated growth and development of the area.  The County has found itself in need of more experienced help that will finish the master planning efforts that have been started and assist the County to prepare the ordinances and regulations that will govern the Dutch John area’s development and ensure the desired orderly growth of the area.

Bonneville Research teamed with the highly respected planning firm Cooper Roberts Simonsen and has brought onto its teamalt two extraordinary economic development professionals – Don Adams, and David Baird.

In planning for the future of the Dutch John area, the Bonneville Research Team worked closely with the Daggett County Commission, the Commission Assistant, the Dutch John Advisory Committee and the Daggett County Planning and Zoning Commission to accomplish the following:

  • Make suggestions on future infrastructure requirements necessary for master plan success.
  • Find additional funding for future projects and development activities, including but not limited to researching, applying for, and administering grants received.
  • Actively seek out and assist interested developers through the necessary processes to complete the desired development.
  • Work with the DJAC and Daggett County government, including elected officials, staff and others to simplify the development process as much as possible.
  • Develop recommendations to ensure proper land use development including the completion of a Master Plan for the Dutch John area.

 

Annexation Study - Heber City, Utah

Nestled in Utah's Wasatch Mountains and adjacent to Park City, Heber City is the economic hub of rapidly growing Wasatch County. Bonneville Research recently concluded an effort for a major commercial and housing developer on a strategy to develop a large 60-acre parcel adjacent to the central core of Heber City. Bonneville Research evaluated the current and future growth trends in the Heber Retail Center general market area, considering the current and future retail, commercial and residential development potential in the market area. Of particular importance to Heber City public officials was the detailed analysis of the net economic benefits to Heber City as a result of the proposed retail, commercial and residential development options at the 60-acre site. The issues considered included a net present value analysis of the economic impacts and 15-year projections of:

  • Incremental Property Taxes
  • Incremental Sales Taxes
  • Impact and other Development Fees

Bonneville Research also evaluated the net incremental service delivery costs to Heber City as a result of the proposed retail, commercial and residential development options at the site, including:

  • Core municipal services to include police, fire, public works, planning, streets and recreation.
  • Administrative and support services to include Courts, general administration and capital investments in land and buildings.

The Bonneville Research report was adopted unanimously by both the Heber City Planning Commission and City Council.

Contact: Wade Williams, The Boyer Company, (801) 521-4781


Salt Lake City Northwest Quadrant - Economic Development Strategy

Bonneville Research is part of the consulting team lead by EDAW to prepare a special area plan for the largely undeveloped Northwest Quadrant of Salt Lake City. This portion of Salt Lake City is west of the Airport and runs from 2100 South to the shores of the Great Salt Lake. Bonneville Research will be preparing the economic development strategy component for the plan.

Contact: Mr. Everett Joyce, Project Manager, Salt Lake City Planning, (801) 535- 7930


Urban Renewal & EDA - Taylorsville, Utah

The City of Taylorsville, Utah, prior to incorporation in 1996, was known as Taylorsville-Bennion. Taylorsville is bordered by West Valley City to the north, Murray City West Jordan City to the south, and Kearns to the west, and has a population of 57,439.  Bonneville Research is currently working with the City of Taylorsville to evaluate the potential of establishing Urban Renewal Project Areas for four sites, and one Economic Development Area. Bonneville Research is preparing a "blight" analysis to evaluate the potential of establishing any or all of the areas as an Urban Renewal (Redevelopment) Project Area and thus eligible for tax increment financing (TIF). The preliminary Bonneville Research Urban Renewal (RDA) Bight Analysis has resulted recommending one site not be considered as an Project Area.

Contact: Don Adams, Economic Development Director, (801) 963-5400


Economic Development Plan - Riverton, Utah

Bonneville Research worked with the highly respected national firm ERA to develop a regional vision for Riverton which was making the transition from a rural satellite community in southern Salt Lake County to a commuting suburban community with different expectations in land use, community services and economic development needs. The plan explored options for future growth and land uses and how those decisions would impact transportation and open space. The comprehensive vision explored the trade-offs between different densities of development, transportation options, including transit, and the benefits of planning for high quality job development, multi-family while maintaining the unique community character and traditions of Riverton.

Contact: Don Adams, now Economic Development Director Taylorsville, (801) 963-5400

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projects - impact study

Impact Study - Los Alamos, New Mexico

Los Alamos County is the former "secret city" completely enmeshed with the and financially dependent on the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The County recently negotiated the trade of a critical large portion of land formerly used by the school district as a "bus park". The Boyer Company hired Bonneville Research to evaluate the economic feasibility of developing the site as a mixed use development. The issues considered included a net present value analysis of the economic impacts and 25-year projections of:

  • Incremental Property Taxes
  • Incremental Sales Taxes

The Bonneville Research information was critical to the voter approval of a referendum to support the project.

Contact: Wade Williams, The Boyer Company, (801) 521-4781


Impact Study - Springville, Utah

Springville is the center of the rapidly growing Southern Utah County. Bonneville Research evaluated the economic impact of a 70-acre mixed-use development in Springville. Bonneville Research prepared a detailed analysis of the net economic benefits to Springville as a result of the proposed retail, commercial and residential development options on site. The issues considered included a net present value analysis of the economic impacts and 15-year projections of:

  • Incremental Property Taxes
  • Incremental Sales Taxes
  • Impact and other Development Fees

Contact: Wade Williams, The Boyer Company, (801) 521-4781


Ivory Homes, Peterson Homes, Wasatch Pacific, ASWN - Economic Impact Analysis

Four major regional housing developers regularly retain Bonneville Research to conduct detailed evaluations of proposed new housing developments. These projects have included single-family detached housing with various lot sizes and often included multi-family and some commercial development. The analysis included a detailed examination of the project revenues and development costs. Information was also generated for the respective government entities showing what revenues they likely would receive and the costs of the services they would be expected to provide. Revenues included impact fees, development fees, as well as ongoing property taxes, other service fees and sales taxes.

Contact: Christopher Gamvroulas, Development Manager, Ivory Homes Phone (801) 747-7440

Contact: Lee Conant, Wasatch Pacific Phone (801) 943-2877

Contac: Paul Stringham, Peterson Homes Phone (801) 532-2233

Contact: Tim Soffe, Sr. Partner, ASWN Phone (801) 269-0055

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projects - transit oriented development

Murray Fireclay Transit-Oriented Development - Murray, Utah

Bonneville Research, CRSA, MGB+A, and Herridge were hired in 2006 to begin work with Murray City on redeveloping a corridor of land along the light rail and commuter rail corridors through the city. Murray has three light rail and one commuter rail station and is trying to establish new land uses and a new sense of place in this part of town that was once an industrial backwater. Bonneville Research is providing a range of financial and redevelopment budget services to help Murray propose feasible projects and attract the developers most skilled at building these specific types of projects.

Contact: Keith Snarr, Economic Development Dir, (801) 270-2418


South Salt Lake Transit Corridor - South Salt Lake, Utah

Working with CRSA, Bonneville Research completed a comprehensive financial impact plan for a proposed light rail corridor land use redevelopment plan for the City of South Salt Lake related to new light rail transit oriented development for four stations. The project included identification of new transit-related traffic patterns, trails and linkages, revitalization of blighted business and neighborhood districts, and redevelopment potentials and implementation strategies.

Contact: Bruce Talbot, former South Salt Lake City Mgr, (801) 782-8529

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projects - commercial development 

Hotel/conference center - Logan, Utah

Bonneville Research worked together with the highly respected international consulting firm ERA to evaluate the economic feasibility of constructing a full-service hotel and conference center in downtown Logan. We worked closely with Logan City, Cache County, the regional travel and convention bureau, Utah State University, the Logan Chamber of Commerce and key downtown merchants on this critical project. The regional hospitality market was analyzed, potential sites were evaluated and proposed developments reviewed.

Contact: Douglas Thompson, former Mayor


Village Center - Holladay City, Utah

Holladay City was incorporated in 1999. It has a village center with many small locally owned businesses, lots of traffic, and long neglected infrastructure. Bonneville Research prepared a "blight" study necessary to establish the Village Center as a Redevelopment Project Area and thus eligible for tax increment financing (TIF). The Bonneville Research RDA Bight Analysis and Project Budget were unanimously approved by the Taxing Entity Committee and the Holladay City Council.

Contact: Dennis Webb, Mayor, (801) 272-9450

Millrock Commercial Center - Holladay City, Utah

Millrock Park is a 22 acre; 490,000 sq ft master planned commercial office campus located in Holladay Utah. This Economic Development Project (EDA) used tax increment financing (TIF) to pay for required infrastructure and insured that a difficult site could be developed as a Class A+ office park. The EDA Benefit Analysis and Project Budget were unanimously approved by the Taxing Entity Committee.

Contact: Randy Fitts, City Manager, (801) 272-9450

Conference/Festival Center - Cedar City, Utah

Cedar City is less a city than a sophisticated small town. It has no towering buildings, little traffic and is the annual host to a highly regarded Shakespeare Festival. Bonneville Research evaluated the economic feasibility of developing conference center in downtown Cedar City. We worked closely with Cedar City, Iron County, the regional travel and convention bureau, Southern Utah State University and key downtown merchants on this critical project. Bonneville Research recommended that a "Festival Center" be developed. Cedar City partnered with Iron County to implement the recommendations.

Contact: Gerald Sherratt, Mayor, (435) 586-2950


Performing Arts Center - Provo City, Utah

CRSA and Bonneville Research evaluated the economic feasibility of developing and operating a Performing Arts Center in downtown Provo. We worked closely with Provo City Recreation and Redevelopment Departments Utah County, Brigham Young University and key performing arts groups on this critical project.  We also worked closely with the Provo Arts Council to identify potential donors and other potential financial supporters.

Contact: Lewis K. Billings, Mayor, (801) 852 - 6100


Nature Center - Farmington City, Utah

CRSA and Bonneville Research evaluated the economic feasibility of developing and operating a Nature Center at Farmington Bay on the western shore of the Great Salt Lake. We worked closely with the Utah State Division of Wildlife Resources, Davis County, Davis School District and key birding and hunting groups on this critical project.  We prepared detailed operational and management plans including financial analysis, including the identification of potential donors and other potential financial supporters.

Contact: Robert Hasenyager, DWR, (801) 726-7817


Clearfield Downtown Revitalization/TOD Plan - Clearfield, Utah

Bonneville Research worked as part of the Economic Development Team (EDT) to help Clearfield City redesign parts of the City to bring new life to the streets and its downtown. EDT worked with a City staff and citizen leaders to propose moving the future commuter rail station to downtown and develop a new plan for the land around it. The final site selection and land use plan is being coordinated with UTA and with proposals from developers who will help build the site and ensure that the buildings are designed, built, sold and leased up to City expectations.

Contact: Don Wood, Mayor, (801) 525-2712


Springville Westfields Annexation Master Plan - Springville, Utah

Bonneville Research, MGB+A, and The Planning Center collaboratively pre-pared a master plan for a 1 ,600 acre parcel located between Interstate 1 5 and Springville City called the Westfields Master Plan. This master plan creatively integrates high-end development into the existing constraints of the site creat­ing opportunities that didn't exist previously. Open space is preserved, traffic circulation is not impeded, ground water is an amenity and owner's wishes creatively integrated into a master plan to guide development into the future.

Contact: Fred Agertar, City Planner, (801) 489-2705


West Valley City Center - West Valley City, Utah

Working with CRSA, Bonneville Research completed a comprehensive retail and housing market potential and financial impact plan for a proposed West Valley City light rail spur into the community. Sponsored by Envision Utah, this project explores the potential for alternative TOD (Transit Oriented Development) land uses around the last station on the light rail line - which is located near the city hall and Valley Fair Mall. This is envisioned as West Valley City's city center and a potential destination for transit riders.

Contact: Joseph Moore, CED Director, (801) 303-1456


Riverdale Entry Master Plan - Riverdale City, Utah

Bonneville Research, MGB+A, and Herridge collaboratively led a planning process to reshape a critical parcel of land at the gateway to Riverdale City. The planning process created a vision for a large parcel of land ripe for development that was in a number of private hands. A series of design charettes were held to explore ideas and build relationships between the many stakeholders of this area. The City applied for special designations to get eco­nomic incentives onto the site to bring in the businesses they desire. This site will now be an asset to the community, instead of a haphazard development.

Contact: Randy Daily, Community Development Dir, (801) 394-5541

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